About the Memorial Hall

About the Memorial Hall

Inscription

Mourning the lives lost in the atomic bombing, we pledge to convey the truth of this tragedy throughout Japan and the world, pass it on to the future, learn the lessons of history, and build a peaceful world free from nuclear weapons.

Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims

Basic Information

Pursuant to the Atomic Bomb Survivors' Assistance Act (No. 117 of 1994), the Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims was built in Hiroshima, site of first atomic bombing in human warfare, by the national government to keep a record of the victims of the bombing and pray for lasting world peace, as well as to deepen international understanding of the horrors of the atomic bombing and pass down the memoirs of the survivors to future generations.

View from the outside of the building
View from the outside of the building
The Hall of Remembrance which displays a view of the city after the bombing as seen from the hypocenter
The Hall of Remembrance which displays a view of the city after the bombing as seen from the hypocenter
The Memorial Hall is located in Peace Memorial Park, south of the Atomic Bomb Dome and near the west end of the Motoyasu-bashi Bridge
The Memorial Hall is located in Peace Memorial Park, south of the Atomic Bomb Dome and near the west end of the Motoyasu-bashi Bridge

Founder

The Japanese National Government (under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW))

Management and Operation

The Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation (entrusted by MHLW)

Building Details

One-story, two basement reinforced concrete building (3,099.40m2)

Architect

Kenzō Tange (Urban Architecture and Design Institute)

Opening Day

August 1, 2002

Timeline to the Opening of the Memorial Hall

1985 October MHLW conducts its first survey of deceased victims of the atomic bombing in its Survey of Atomic Bomb Survivors (Hibakusha)
1990 MHLW begins discussion on how to memorialize to those lost to the bombing
1991 The national government establishes the Facility to Memorialize the Victims of the Atomic Bombing Basic Concepts Council
1993 The national government establishes the Facility to Memorialize the Victims Basic Plan Review Conference
1994 December

Establishment of the Atomic Bomb Survivors' Assistance Act (July 1995)

From the Preamble:
Here, on the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombings, we renew our resolve to the absolute abolition of nuclear weapons together with our prayer for a world of lasting peace where the horrors of the atomic bombings are never repeated, and, as the responsibility of our nation and in light of the fact that the effects wrought upon human health by radiation caused by the bombings are a unique kind of damage from which differs from other damages of war, we hereby establish this law to implement comprehensive health, medical, and welfare assistance measures for the aging Hibakusha as well as to, as a nation, keep a record of the precious lives lost to the atomic bombings.
Article 41:
We shall keep a record of the precious lives lost to the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and, in the hopes of lasting peace, work to deepen national understanding of the horrors nuclear weapons, pass down the experiences of the bombing to our future generations, and memorialize those lost to the bombings.
Supplementary resolution from the Committee on Health and Welfare:
Together with planning for a swift establishment of a facility to console the victims of the atomic bombings, we will work to make the facility one which the Hibakusha and the bereaved families of the victims will approve.
1995 November The national government establishes the National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims Opening Preparation Review Conference
1995 November MHLW calls for atomic bombing memoir submissions in their Survey of Atomic Bomb Survivors (Hibakusha)
1996 January The City of Hiroshima holds the Construction of the Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims Hiroshima Review Conference
1997 April The City of Hiroshima is commissioned by the national government and begins work collecting and organizing atomic bombing memoirs
1998 September The Construction of the Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims Hiroshima Review Conference unveils its final report; proposes the philosophy of the Memorial Hall.
1999 December Construction begins on the Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims
2001 March Collection of the names and portraits of the victims of the bombing
2002 August Hiroshima National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims opens
2003 July Nagasaki National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims opens

Memorial Hall Facts and Figures (as of March 31, 2020)

For more information, please see the Memorial Hall Facts and Figures [PDF: 587KB].

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